DEG Making Plans for the Future

Activities Offer Opportunities

Every so often it is good to review and evaluate DEG’s mission and goals. This year AAPG is preparing a five-year tactical business plan, and as an AAPG Division, DEG also is preparing one. Though somewhat painful, it is an insightful and empowering process that gives us a much clearer picture of where we are, where we want to go and what we need to do to get there. The tactical business plan is a means to build continuity into the operation of DEG and to better align DEG with other groups and entities within AAPG.


Environmental geoscience activities at two recent AAPG Section meetings provided DEG members and others excellent opportunities to learn new things.

  • Approximately 40 percent of the presentations at the GCAGS meeting in Lafayette, La., were about environmental geosciences. Environmental sessions covered a wide range of topics including hydrogeology, geochemistry, remote sensing, environmental geophysical techniques and site remediation.

The meeting also included sessions about Geologic Record of Hurricanes, Coastal Processes, Louisiana Hurricane Impacts and Coastal Processes, Paleostorm Records from around the World and Reconstruction of Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Hurricane Chronologies.

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Every so often it is good to review and evaluate DEG’s mission and goals. This year AAPG is preparing a five-year tactical business plan, and as an AAPG Division, DEG also is preparing one. Though somewhat painful, it is an insightful and empowering process that gives us a much clearer picture of where we are, where we want to go and what we need to do to get there. The tactical business plan is a means to build continuity into the operation of DEG and to better align DEG with other groups and entities within AAPG.


Environmental geoscience activities at two recent AAPG Section meetings provided DEG members and others excellent opportunities to learn new things.

  • Approximately 40 percent of the presentations at the GCAGS meeting in Lafayette, La., were about environmental geosciences. Environmental sessions covered a wide range of topics including hydrogeology, geochemistry, remote sensing, environmental geophysical techniques and site remediation.

The meeting also included sessions about Geologic Record of Hurricanes, Coastal Processes, Louisiana Hurricane Impacts and Coastal Processes, Paleostorm Records from around the World and Reconstruction of Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Hurricane Chronologies.

  • Environmental geoscience presentations at the Eastern Section meeting in Buffalo, N.Y. involved aspects of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration, including CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers, CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery and coal-seam sequestration.

The New York State Geological Association field trips were held in conjunction with the meeting, and the environmental field trip, “Famous Hazardous Waste Sites and Fractured Rock Hydrology of the Niagara Falls Area, Niagara County, New York State,” included a field stop at the infamous Love Canal.


DEG Vice President Mike Jacobs has been the driving force in revitalizing DEG committees and developing new ones. One of the objectives of these committees is to assist in planning DEG sessions, short courses, workshops and field trips at AAPG annual meetings and future DEG publications.

Three of these committees are currently seeking members: Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Committee, Environmental Geophysics Committee and Hydrogeology Committee. If you are interested in being actively involved in any of these committees, please contact Mike Jacobs.

Matt Grobe, chair of the EMD/DEG CO2 Book Committee and lead editor, reports the proposed volume titled “Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Media -- State of the Art,” has been approved for publication as an AAPG Special Publication. DEG recently received an AAPG Foundation grant to help fund production costs of this volume, and we are most appreciative of their support.


The 2008 AAPG Annual Convention is scheduled for April 20-23 in San Antonio. DEG again will sponsor technical sessions, and we are specifically seeking your ideas for sessions, field trips and short courses with an environmental focus.

Of particular interest are issues related to mineral, gas and oilfield waste disposal, ground water management, remote sensing, environmental forensics and near-surface geophysics for site assessment and monitoring, exploration and production in environmentally sensitive areas, carbon dioxide sequestration, carbon credits and climate change, as well as geoscience and public policy.

Recent DEG Technical Sessions included:

  • Naturally Occurring Oil Seeps, Impact of Synthetic Muds and Discharge of Cuttings.
  • Ground Water Issues: Resource, Exploration, Exploitation and Remediation.
  • Remediation of Affected Soil and Groundwater.
  • Exploration and Production Environmental Issues and Best Management Practices: Impacts on Water, Soil and Ecosystems.
  • Environmental Issues Related to UnconventionalResources.
  • CO2 Sequestration: Coals/Shales/Produced and Unproduced Reservoirs as Sequestration Targets.
  • Carbon Management and Acid Gas Sequestration.
  • Uranium Energy: Source to Power to Repository.
  • The Future of Global Energy: Technical, Environmental, Economic and Policy Issues.

Please send your suggestions for DEG-sponsored sessions to the DEG technical vice chair, Cynthia Dinwiddie. Please provide contact information with your recommendations and indicate your willingness to chair a session.

The submittal of an idea for a session, short course or field trip does not guarantee its inclusion in the 2008 AAPG program, but your submittal ensures the Program Committee will have a productive resource from which to develop a program that all will enjoy.

The deadline for submitting your ideas for technical sessions, field trips and short courses is Dec. 15.