Shallow Water Vessel to Meet Specialized Needs

When the folks at Global Geophysical were making plans for the July christening< of their new seismic vessel, the M/V James H. Scott, they recognized the event called for something other than the standard ho-hum champagne ceremony. After all, the festivities would take place in the town of New Iberia in southernmost Louisiana, long known as a place where the good times roll.

Given the region's colorful reputation and the town's proximity just up the road from Avery Island salt dome -- home to world-famous Tabasco products — it was entirely appropriate that the new boat ultimately was christened with a gallon jug of Tabasco sauce.

Image Caption

Crew members watch as Sara Scott and Terry Sadler wield a gallon of Tabasco sauce toward the M/V James H. Scott seismic vessel at the christening ceremony.

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When the folks at Global Geophysical were making plans for the July christening< of their new seismic vessel, the M/V James H. Scott, they recognized the event called for something other than the standard ho-hum champagne ceremony. After all, the festivities would take place in the town of New Iberia in southernmost Louisiana, long known as a place where the good times roll.

Given the region's colorful reputation and the town's proximity just up the road from Avery Island salt dome -- home to world-famous Tabasco products — it was entirely appropriate that the new boat ultimately was christened with a gallon jug of Tabasco sauce.

The unconventional ceremony was also in keeping with the uniqueness of the vessel itself, which was built in direct response to the need for advanced technology to adequately work shallow water deep plays, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico.

"The shallow shelf has been gaining momentum for some time," said Global president Richard Degner. "It became apparent a year ago that there was a need for a specialized aluminum-hold catamaran vessel with airguns that could provide exceptional utility in very shallow water of less than 10 feet, with a very large marine source, i.e., a 100 bar-meter source."

With its light weight, all-aluminum design and shallow draft of less than five feet, the Scott — which came with a price tag of $3 million — can take its large source array into the very shallow waters, shallow marine inlets, estuaries and bays worldwide.

It is noteworthy that along with all of its state-of-the-art technology, the Scott also serves as a reminder of the human side of the seismic industry — the vessel was named in honor of the late James Scott, a well known, highly regarded and talented marine crew manager at Western Geophysical prior to joining PGS Onshore with his friend Degner. During his career, Scott worked worldwide in challenging shallow marine environments of the GOM, West Africa, the Middle East and more.

Scott's sister was on hand to wield the jug of Tabasco sauce at the christening ceremony, and several of his former crew members operate the boat today.

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