Where's An Analog?

Where Do Companies Get Their Analog Information?

Where do companies get their analog information? From various sources, according to survey responses.

Some answers: data purchased from third parties, literature searches, databases and consortia studies.

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Where do companies get their analog information? From various sources, according to survey responses.

Some answers: data purchased from third parties, literature searches, databases and consortia studies.

Half the companies interviewed have purchased an analog database system, and five companies are building custom in-house digital analog systems.

"We thought the super majors would have similar in-house analog systems in place, but we were surprised to find that is not the case," Wan said. "None of those (surveyed) companies have an in-house system."

There are likely many reasons for this, Wan said, including:

  • The flux in the industry created by mergers and acquisitions.
  • Movements of personnel from one project area to another.
  • An emphasis on finding and producing oil and gas rather than documenting and compiling data.

"Systematic documenting and codifying information and building a system to house that data would require a major commitment," Wan said. "Most companies indicated they could get the data from public libraries or third party providers." Some even take field trips.


Bonus Inclusion:

Survey participants made several recommendations to improve the application of geological analogs. These include:

  • Documenting and publishing best practices.
  • Establishing a consortium to fund the creation of a methodology for integrating seismic analog information with outcrop and subsurface geological data and engineering data.
  • More education to convince a greater number of production geologists and reservoir engineers that decisions based solely on "closeology" methods may not be optimum.
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